Terry Pratchett

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Plays by Terry Pratchett

The Fifth Elephant

Bloomsbury Publishing
Type: Text

When Commander Vimes was sent to wild, wintry Überwald to establish trade links with the new Low King of the Dwarfs, he suspected that it wouldn’t just be a case of handing out cucumber sandwiches and smiling politely. But he didn’t realise he’d end up trying to stop a war.

The historic coronation seat has been stolen, Cheery and Detritus are having trouble with some of the more stoutly conservative dwarves, and Vimes has to pop round and see the local aristocracy – both the ones that like to drink blood and the ones that turn into wolves. Pretty soon he’s an escaped prisoner, out in the icy woods, wearing only the gloomy trousers of Uncle Vanya and being chased by a pack of fascist werewolves who don’t play by the rules. He had warned them that diplomacy wasn’t his strong suit.

The Fifth Elephant is a faithful adaptation of the hilarious Terry Pratchett novel of the same name. It was first performed in 1999 at the Unicorn Theatre, Abingdon.

Going Postal

Bloomsbury Publishing
Type: Text

Moist von Lipwig was a con artist, a fraud and a man faced with a life choice: be hanged, or put Ankh-Morpork’s ailing postal service back on its feet.

It was a tough decision.

With the help of a golem who has been at the bottom of a hole in the ground for over two hundred years, a pin fanatic and Junior Postman Groat, he’s got to see that the mail gets through. In taking on the evil chairman of the Grand Trunk Semaphore Company and a midnight killer, he’s also go to stay alive. Getting a date with Adora Belle Dearheart would be nice, too.

In the mad world of the mail, a criminal might be able to succeed where honest men have failed and died. Perhaps there’s a shot at redemption for a man who is prepared to push the envelope...

Going Postal is a faithful adaptation of Terry Pratchett’s hilarious novel of the same name. It was first performed at the Unicorn Theatre, Abingdon in 2005.

Interesting Times

Bloomsbury Publishing
Type: Text

Interesting Times is a Discworld story about barbarians, revolutionaries, assassinations, desperate battles and a travel memoir.

Rincewind, Discworld's most inept wizard, has been sent from Unseen University in Ankh-Morpork to the oppressive Agatean Empire, to help some well-intentioned revolutionaries overthrow the Emperor. He's assisted by toy-rabbit-wielding rebels, an army of terracotta warriors, a tax gatherer and a group of seven very elderly barbarian heroes lead by Cohen the Barbarian. Opposing him is the evil and manipulative Lord Hong and his army of 750,000 men.

Rincewind is also aided by Twoflower – Discworld's first tourist and the author of a subversive book about his visit to Ankh-Morpork, which has inspired the rebels in their struggle for freedom. The book is called What I Did On My Holidays.

Interesting Times is the adaptation of the best-selling Terry Pratchett novel of the same name, and was first performed at the Unicorn Theatre, Abingdon, in 2001.

Jingo

Bloomsbury Publishing
Type: Text

Somewhere in the Circle Sea between Ankh-Morpork and Al-Khali, a fisherman’s boat bumps into a weathervane. Inevitably, this results in the declaration of war.

The Lost Kingdom of Leshp has emerged after hundreds of years beneath the waves. And so with no ships, no army and no money, Ankh-Morpork goes to war against the Klatchian army claiming the rock as their own. To add injury to insult, a visiting Klatchian prince is wounded in an assassination attempt. This is only stopped from becoming a major diplomatic incident by Sir Samuel Vimes of the City Watch, who knows how politics works and is determined not to give it any opportunity to do so.

Undaunted by the prospect of being tortured to death by vastly superior numbers of enemy troops, a small band of intrepid men and an increasingly stupid troll set out under Vimes’s command. If they can survive long enough, maybe they can arrest an entire army for breach of the peace.

Jingo is a faithful adaptation of Terry Pratchett’s hilarious novel of the same name. It was first performed at the Unicorn Theatre, Abingdon, in 1997.

Monstrous Regiment

Bloomsbury Publishing
Type: Text

With the armies of the Discworld ranged against them, the tiny, impoverished country of Borogravia is down to their last regiment, and their last scrap of hope. Unfortunately there’s something rather odd about the regiment in question.

The Monstrous Regiment is made up of a reformed vampire, Igor the highly progressive surgeon, a troll, and a young woman who discovers that a pair of socks shoved down the front of her trousers is a good way to open doors in a man’s army. Polly cut off her hair and learned to walk like a man so that she could join the Borogravian militia and find her brother, but suddenly the new recruits are in the middle of the war, without any training or uniforms that fit. To make matters worse, they are definitely losing. Polly finds that to survive she will have to fight dirty, pretend to know how to shave and even occasionally dress up as a woman.

Monstrous Regiment is the adaptation of the best-selling Terry Pratchett novel of the same name, and was first performed at the Unicorn Theatre, Abingdon, in 2001.

Night Watch

Bloomsbury Publishing
Type: Text

Night Watch is a Discworld tale of one city, with a full chorus of street urchins, ladies of negotiable affection, rebels, secret policemen, grannies, and two Sam Vimeses.

Commander Vimes knows that revolutions just come round again – the clue is in the name – but he didn’t expect it to happen quite so literally. On the anniversary of Ankh-Morpork’s great uprising, Vimes is locked in a deadly struggle with a psychopathic criminal, and falls off a roof and back in time – right back to the revolution he remembers from his youth.

Back in his rough and tough past without even the clothes he was standing up in, Vimes has to ensure that history takes its course so that the right future will emerge, and stay alive so that he can get back to it. He must track down a murderer, teach his younger self how to be a good copper, outmanoeuvre the vile Cable Street Unmentionables and their suspiciously psychopathic new Sergeant, and look after a bloody revolution.

Night Watch is a faithful adaptation of the hilarious Terry Pratchett novel of the same name. It was first performed in 2003 at the Unicorn Theatre, Abingdon.

The Truth (Pratchett)

Bloomsbury Publishing
Type: Text

There’s been a murder. Allegedly, that is. William de Worde has accidentally become the Discworld’s first investigative journalist – he didn’t mean to, he just wrote down what had been happening in the city, and then the dwarves invented the printing press, and suddenly he’s in charge of a newspaper.

But no sooner has the free press been invented than quite a few people are wishing it could be locked up. The City Watch is trying to investigate a very strange crime committed in the Patrician’s office, while dark forces high up in Ankh-Morpork’s society are plotting to take over the city, and William writing down what everyone’s saying isn’t helping either of them. But he’s determined to take on the forces of untruth and obfuscation, with the help of some dwarves, a novice reporter, a photosensitive vampire iconographer, and a talking dog – except dogs can’t talk, of course.

The Truth is a faithful adaptation of Terry Pratchett’s hilarious novel of the same name, and was first presented in 2000 at the Unicorn Theatre, Abingdon.

Picture of Terry Pratchett

Sir Terry Pratchett, OBE, is one of the most popular authors writing today. He lives behind a keyboard in Wiltshire and says he 'doesn't want to get a life, because it feels as though he's trying to lead three already'. He was appointed OBE in 1998, and knighted in 2009. He is the author of the phenomenally successful Discworld series. Many of his books have been adapted for the stage and are published by Methuen Drama.